Railway induced vibration: a threat to our health

More and more people rely on public transport to commute to work or go about their daily business, a green trend that is stimulated by the European Commission that aims to increase rail capacity by 50% in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Nevertheless, on a more local level this increase in rail traffic may have negative implications for the quality of life and individual health of populations living close to railways.

A recent study performed among the citizens of the Västra Götaland and Värmland regions in Sweden shows that vibrations from rail transport are experienced through a number of senses. The chronic nature of exposure to this environmental stressor was a recurring topic. The inability to avoid or mitigate vibrations has been proven to have negative repercussions for one’s health and well-being.

The proximity to railways and the exposure to constant vibrations causes a series of illnesses such as elevated blood pressure, anxiety, insomnia, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

In 2011 the World Health Organization already warned that 1.8% of myocardial infarctions can be attributed to exposure to road traffic noise and only a few months ago they stated that around 466 million people worldwide have disabling hearing loss, and it is estimated that by 2050 over 900 million people will have disabling hearing loss caused by noise pollution.

We at CDM Group are constantly trying to “make our world a quieter place” by developing new and effective solutions to decouple entire buildings or building layers, preventing harmful vibrations from causing harm to both infrastructure and public health.


Maclachlan, L., Waye, K. P., & Pedersen, E. (2017). Exploring Perception of Vibrations from Rail: An Interview Study. International journal of environmental research and public health14(11), 1303. doi:10.3390/ijerph14111303

World Health Organization . Burden of Disease from Environmental Noise, Quantification of Healthy Life Years Lost in Europe. World Health Organisation; Copenhagen, Denmark: 2011.

DIT Grangegorman East Quad Dublin City Campus

Construction of the new Grangegorman campus for the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) is well underway. The East Quad buildings will accommodate the majority of academic activities and facilities required for the College of Creative & Cultural Industries.

The accommodation will include a 400 seat music performance hall, various practice spaces and creative arts & media studios. The gross internal floor area for the East Quad will be approximately 16,000 square meters.

After successfully designing the largest floating floor for the Cork School of Music, CDM Ireland has now been asked to install a state-of-the-art floating floor for the Grangegorman East Quad site. Over 2,100 m² of CDM-LAT, QDECK and WALL-FIX isolation systems will be installed to decouple the floor in order to improve acoustics by preventing vibrations and noise pollution to travel through the building layers.

Project: DIT Grangegorman East Quad Dublin, Ireland
Product: CDM-LAT, CDM-QDECK and CDM-WALL-FIX
Project Owner: Dublin Institute of Technology
Acoustic Consultant: IAcoustics
Main Contractor: SISK Group
Architect: Mullarkey Pedersen & Sheppard Robson
Structural Engineer: Malone O’Regan Consulting

CDM will be at ICSV 24

The ICSV 24 congress is a leading event in the area of acoustics and vibration and provides an important opportunity for scientists and engineers to share their latest research results and exchange ideas on theories, technologies and applications in these fields. The congress will feature a broad range of high-level technical papers from across the world: distinguished plenary lecturers will present recent developments in important topics of sound and vibration and include discussions about future trends.

icsv 24 - 2017

Visit us at booth 31.
For more information about this event, visit the website here!